Jessica Chapnik Kahn is not interested in being a mere mortal. After years of mortality she decided to give birth to something else. Herself. As Appleonia.

Appleonia, aka Jessica Chapnik Kahn, is a songwriter, actor and director. Born in Argentina and immigrating to Sydney as a child, Jessica has toured and played in the bands of several Australian artists including Sarah Blasko, Old Man River and Ben Lee.

Here are some things about Jessica Chapnik Kahn that you might like to know: she immigrated to Australia as a child from Argentina. She lived in a migrant hostel. She was raised by Jewish Polish Catholic Italian Argentinian parents who joined a couple of cults along the way. She dreams in Spanish. Her first crush was Marilyn Monroe, followed closely by Lady Diana. She acts. She formed her first band at 17. As a teenager she studied the bible. As an adult she studies with a Rabbi. She visits a young saint in India. She was on an Australian soap opera. She doesn’t know how to swim, but she lives by the sea. She has a cat phobia. It is tensions and obsessions like these that have influenced her music-making to date.

In 2013, Jessica composed the music for the feature documentary “Despite The Gods”, a biopic of Hollywood’s prodigal daughter Jennifer Lynch (daughter of cult director David Lynch). The soundtrack album was Appleonia’s debut release; a dreamy, Indian-inspired landscape, featuring guest appearances by Australian musicians including Craig Nicholls from The Vines.

Also in 2013, Jessica co-wrote and co-produced Ben Lee’s solo album, “Ayahuasca: Welcome to the Work”. The pair first worked together in 2008 collaborating on the soundtrack for the Australian film “The Square”, directed by Nash Edgerton. The album was nominated for an ARIA and AFI award.

In January 2014, Jessica released her album OH, a collection of songs written by Jessica and featuring a number of producers and collaborators such as Ben Lee, Jimmy Tamberello (The Postal Service), Ian Ball (Gomez), Nic Johns (The Motels), El May and Nadav Kahn.

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